By Meg Wiviott

A local cat observes the adjustments in German and Jewish households in its city through the interval best as much as Kristallnacht, the evening of damaged Glass that turns into the genuine starting of the Holocaust. This cats-eye view introduces the Holocaust to teenagers in a steady means that may open dialogue of this era.

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Extra resources for Benno and the Night of Broken Glass

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Kristallnacht: The Nazi Night of Terror, Random House, New York, 1989. Schwab, Gerald. The Day the Holocaust Began: The Odyssey of Herschel Grynszpan, Praeger, New York, 1990. Thalmann, Rita and Emmanuel Feinermann. , New York, 1974. Additional Children’s Books About the Holocaust Abells, Chana Byers. The Children We Remember. New York: HarperTrophy, 2002. Adler, David A. The Number on my Grandfather’s Arm. Y: UAHC, 1987. Bunting, Eve. Terrible Things: An Allegory of the Holocaust. Philadelphia: Jewish Publication Society, 1993.

Only a few nations spoke out against the events of Kristallnacht, showing the Nazis that the world would tolerate the persecution of Jews on a mass scale. The Holocaust had begun. Bibliography Sources Read, Anthony and David Fisher. Kristallnacht: The Nazi Night of Terror, Random House, New York, 1989. Schwab, Gerald. The Day the Holocaust Began: The Odyssey of Herschel Grynszpan, Praeger, New York, 1990. Thalmann, Rita and Emmanuel Feinermann. , New York, 1974. Additional Children’s Books About the Holocaust Abells, Chana Byers.

Willy and Max: A Holocaust Story. Y: Philomel Books, 2005. Polacco, Patricia. The Butterfly. New York: Philomel Books, 2000. Print. Meg Wiviott grew up in New Jersey. She attended the University of Wisconsin where she majored in History, and earned a Master’s degree in Education from Northwestern University. She is working on a Master’s of Fine Arts degree at Vermont College of Fine Arts, in their Writing for Children and Young Adults program. Meg and her husband have two grown children and live in New Jersey.

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